Category Archives: Teaching Memos

Learning to Like What We Do Not Like (bootstrapping preferences)

Sometimes, we just like what we like. Our preferences have real costs (and benefits, to be sure). If we don’t like a subject in school, at any level, we struggle to find what typically counts as success. It feels difficult, … Continue reading

Posted in Education, Rough Ideas and Arguments, Teaching Memos | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

The Grand Tour, Revitalized

For quite a long time, particularly in Victorian-era England and in the upper echelons of society in the United States, children of well-to-do families set out (or were sent out, more accurately put) upon lengthy grand tours of Continental Europe. … Continue reading

Posted in Rough Ideas and Arguments, Teaching Memos, Travels | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Learning to Think Like a Kid (Teaching Memo)

For the past year, I have been teaching the fifth grade. It is a departure far from teaching college students about Plato, Kant, James, and Arendt. However, I have been very pleasantly surprised and accordingly have learned a lot in … Continue reading

Posted in Teaching Memos | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Teaching Memo 3: Remaining Teachable

One of the most important characteristics of a good teacher is a commitment to remain teachable. This is not, as it sounds, mere proverb. It must be demonstrated. Every semester, I engage in an ongoing evaluation of my teaching habits … Continue reading

Posted in Teaching Memos | Tagged , | 1 Comment

Teaching Memo 2: Using “Scaffolded Writing” Assignments to Teach Critical Skills

In a recent paper in the journal Teaching Philosophy, Cynthia D. Coe wrote about teaching via “scaffolded writing,” which she describes as follows: Scaffolding breaks [the expectations about critical thinking and writing] into a progressive series of papers, moving from … Continue reading

Posted in Teaching Memos | Tagged , | Leave a comment